16 Years Ago: PRURIENT live on A Dark and Tranquil Place

Daily Noise - 15 February 2019

16 Years Ago: PRURIENT live on A Dark and Tranquil Place

16 Years Ago: PRURIENT live on A Dark and Tranquil Place


PRURIENT (Dominick Fernow) performed live on Peter Lee's radio show A Dark and Tranquil Place on this day in 2003. The programme aired on New England station WRIU.

The recording was released in 2005 as a split CD with AKITSA through Fernow's excellent label Hospital Productions.

Dominick and I go way back; we have known since 1997 or so. According to him, our first exchange would have been on MSBR.org, a forum of harsh noise very popular at the time. We started to trade each other via mail and more or less had regular contact for some time.

Eventually, I started to have disdain for the noise scene, and Dominick and I lost contact. Then in 2003, Mikko Aspa did a mini tour in the USA, and I went to see him in Boston and Providence, where Dom lived. It is there that we restablished contact. I think at the time, he was into Cradle Of Filth and Gorgoroth, but when he heard Akitsa he said, "Hey, but it's possible to do it that way?" Shortly after, he sent me a huge package with his new LP Pleasure Ground. Then I began to see that Prurient was serious, and we started to expand collaborations, making splits together. He told me that he loved Akitsa and has remained a very good friend since.

O.T. / Akitsa interview, Noisey, 2015

I feel like some of the harsher chaotic bands, like Prurient, are sustaining the chaos of punk, but most noise has become structured, even if it is not rhythmic. Rhythmic noise isn't necessarily sterile, as it is over saturated. Some of the rhythmic noise bands, like Pal and Synapscape, still have the aggressive and unpredictable edge to them and don't fall into the formulated sound of copycat bands. There are still original bands coming out of the rhythmic noise scene, but you have to pick and choose. Power electronics can share the same use of political thought as punk does, but it's too militant and structured to ever be considered punk.

Peter Lee interview, Chain D.L.K., 2003